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Pneumatosis intestinalis CT

Many patients with pneumatosis intestinalis on CT can be successfully treated nonoperatively. In determining a management strategy, abnormal physical examination findings were more predictive of the need for surgical intervention than laboratory values or radiographic findings Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis is a radiopathological entity characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the submucosa and/or gastrointestinal subserosa of the small intestine Computed tomography (CT) is usually requested to detect underlying disease. The presence of pneumatosis intestinalis often leads physicians to make a diagnosis of serious disease. However, an erroneous diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis may be made (i.e. pseudo-pneumatosis) when intraluminal beads of gas are trapped within or between faeces. The circular form of PI is usually benign and most often seen with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI). Linear or bubble-like PI can be due to both benign and life-threatening causes, and its radiographic or CT appearance alone does not allow differentiation between them. In PI due to benign causes, the bowel wall is usually normal

OBJECTIVE. The frequency of detection of pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) appears to be increasing. This increase may be the result of increased CT use. New medications and surgical procedures have been reported to be associated with an increase in the incidence of PI Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI), defined as gas in the bowel wall, is often first identified on abdominal radiographs or computed tomography (CT) scans. It is a radiographic finding and not a.. Abdominal radiography and CT are the most common imaging techniques used to diagnose pneumatosis intestinalis. However, abdominal radiography is often too insensitive to detect early stages of pneumatosis or assess the underlying disease [ 2, 5 ] INTRODUCTION Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) refers to the presence of gas within the wall of the small or large intestine. Intramural gas can also affect the stomach, but this condition is referred to as gastric pneumatosis [ 1 ] Pneumatosis Intestinalis and hepato-portal venous gas are rare but ominous radiological findings that are synonymous with mesenteric ischaemia and bowel infarction in the majority of cases. Very uncommonly benign pathology have been implicated, including respiratory and inflammatory bowel disease

Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis is a rare condition with unclear pathogenesis which has been associated with many other medical conditions. The majority of patients are asymptomatic and the condition is, thus, likely underreported. Pneumatosis may be found in a subserosal or submucosal location Distinguishing benign and life-threatening pneumatosis intestinalis in patients with cancer by CT imaging features. Lee KS (1), Hwang S, Hurtado Rúa SM, Janjigian YY, Gollub MJ Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis is a rare and often presents nonspecific symptoms. In this case, CT imaging revealed air collection within the wall of the ileum, which was more clearly defined using the lung window setting. When we consider pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, we should evaluate CT using the lung window setting

Computed tomographic diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis

  1. CT is not a first-line imaging study but has been shown to be more sensitive at detecting pneumatosis intestinalis and portal venous gas compared to plain radiography. CT may also demonstrate bowel wall thickening, free fluid, and peri-intestinal soft-tissue stranding, which are associated with a serious underlying process
  2. al radiography or CT scanning, but it could also be documented by MRI and ultrasonography. 2 - 4
  3. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is defined as presence of gas in the bowel wall (1 - 6). Because of the presence of PI, the bowel is in a pathologic state
  4. Intestinal pneumatosis (IP) is a rare condition that affects 0.03% of the population [ 1 ]. It is defined as pathological gas infiltration into the bowel wall. IP has been known for a long time: it was first described by Du Vernoy in 1730 [ 2 ]

Pneumatosis intestinalis. - Mottled, bubbly, or linear collections of gas in bowel wall; feces-like appearance. - Dilated bowel loops ± thumbprinting. Pneumatosis coli. - Radiolucent cysts resembling polyps, clustered along colonic contours. - Multiple large gas-filled cysts with scalloped defects in bowel wall, mimicking inflammatory. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is an uncommon condition characterized by multiple air-filled cystic lesions in the submucosa or subserosa of the intestine. Patient presentation ranges from asymptomatic to diarrhea, abdominal pain, constipation, or rectal bleeding. PI itself is not a disease, but a radiographic or physical finding Pneumatosis intestinalis is often identified on abdominal radiographs; however, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may confirm the diagnosis, give some additional informations and help in determining the primary cause or some possible coexistent complications Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is an unusual condition that is characterized pathologically by multiple thin-walled, noncommunicating, gas-filled cysts in the submucosal or subserosal layer of the gastrointestinal wall. This paper describes the interesting CT colonographic findings of two patients with PCI, showing multiple gas-filled cysts in the colonic wall

Axial contrast-enhanced CT shows an irregular column of gas (arrow) between the wall and the intestinal content stopping at the free gas-fluid level (short arrow) within the bowel lumen, consistent with pseudo-pneumatosis intestinalis Fig. 15 Intramural gas in a 26-year-old woman with worsening abdominal pain. a Axial CT at a lung window shows. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a radiologic finding which is characterized by the accumulation of gas within the bowel wall. This radiologic finding is traditionally thought of in the sense of intestinal ischemia. An uncommon cause of this finding is post organ transplantation

Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis Radiology Reference

Pseudo-pneumatosis intestinalis is defined as the presence of intraluminal beads of gas trapped within or between faeces and the adjacent mucosal folds and may mimic the intramural gas of pneumatosis intestinalis [1]. The causes of pneumatosis intestinalis are traditionally divided into two categories: benign conditions (such as asthma. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a rare finding that may accompany benign, self-limiting processes or signal potentially fatal circumstances that require urgent surgical intervention. Because it is a pathological sign and not a diagnosis itself, PI may be associated with various underlying etiologies, from benign, self-limiting conditions to. A CT scan was obtained, which showed pneuma - tosis of the small bowel and extensive pneumoperitoneum, and he was urgently taken to the OR for concern of hollow viscous injury with possible bowel ischemia (Figure 1). Pneumatosis intestinalis and portomesenteric venous gas i Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis. Air-containing, cystic lucencies are seen in bowel wall in proximal descending colon (white circle) and in the wall of the large bowel in the lower abdomen (black arrows). The shape, density and location are characteristic for pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis Pneumatosis intestinalis (also called intestinal pneumatosis, pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, pneumatosis coli, or intramural bowel gas) is pneumatosis of an intestine, that is, gas cysts in the bowel wall. As a radiological sign it is highly suggestive for necrotizing enterocolitis.This is in contrast to gas in the intestinal lumen (which is relieved by flatulence)

Pneumatosis intestinalis versus pseudo-pneumatosis: review

Pneumatosis Intestinalis in the Adult: Benign to Life

  1. Clinical and CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant and oncology patients 30 July 2008 | Pediatric Radiology, Vol. 38, No. 10 World Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 14, No. 3
  2. Computed tomography A non-contrast CT scan of the abdomen showed 'pneumatosis intestinalis' involving focal dilated small bowel loop. Contrast CT showed a filling defect in the distal segmental branches of the superior mesenteric artery. Mild atherosclerotic disease of the mesenteric arteries was noted
  3. Pneumatosis intestinalis in patients with ischemia: correlation of CT findings with viability of the bowel. . 2003;180(3):733-736.AJR Am J Roentgenol. 25. Wiesner W, Mortele KJ, Glickman JN, et al. Pneumatosis intestinalis and portomesenteric venous gas in intestinal ischemia: correlation of CT findings with severity of ischemia and clinical.
  4. Massive Pneumatosis Intestinalis (PI) could be seen (Figure 1, A to E) on the scout view (black arrows on A). On subsequent coronal (B) and axial (C to E) Computed Tomography (CT), colonic submucosal (blue arrows), extensive subserosal, mesenteric (yellow stars) and free posterior retroperitoneal gas (black arrowheads) were depicted

  1. Pneumatosis intestinalis and portomesenteric venous gas in intestinal ischemia: correlation of CT findings with severity of ischemia and clinical outcome. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2001; 177 : 1319-1323
  2. Pneumatosis intestinalis is an imaging phenomenon representing the presence of gas in the bowel wall. It was first recognized by DuVernoi in 1730 during a cadaver dissection, and there have since been numerous reports of various underlying diseases [1-7].Pneumatosis intestinalis was defined as a radiographic diagnosis by Lerner and Gazin as early as 1946 []
  3. ant forms. Treatment for such conditions includes antibiotic therapy, diet therapy, oxygen therapy and surgery
  4. ated the concept of benign or malignant pneumatosis. Any type of PI should be considered as part of an acute injury to the bowel. Any process that is accompanied by a break.
  5. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is characterized by the accumulation of gas in the intestinal wall. It is not considered to be a disease itself, but rather a pathologic and radiographic finding
  6. Pneumatosis intestinalis refers to the presence of gas within the wall of the small intestine or the colon. These cases are often called by other names such as pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis, intramural gas, pneumatosis coli, pseudolipomatosis, intestinal emphysema, bullous emphysema of the intestine, and lymphopneumatosis. 1 , 2 Cases are.
Pneumatosis Intestinalis - The Journal of Pediatrics

Pneumatosis Intestinalis Imaging: Practice Essentials

No GI symptoms were reported during hospitalisation, but a lung contrast-enhancement CT (CE-CT) excluding thromboembolism showed, as collateral finding, intraperitoneal free bubbles not present on a previous CT examination; the subsequent abdominal CE-CT described pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) involving the caecum and the right colon A diagnosis of appendicitis in association with CT. pneumatosis intestinalis and portal venous gas was made and The mechanism by which gas enters the portal venous the patient underwent emergency surgery. At surgery, the find- system is unclear. Despite this, patients can be divided into two ings of acute appendicitis and pneumatosis. Pneumatosis intestinalis has a variety of benign and life-threatening causes. Pneumatosis intestinalis is defined by gaseous infiltration into the submucosa or subserosa of the bowel wall and may be identified with X-ray, ultrasound or CT scan. When compared with X-ray or ultrasound, CT features higher sensitivity for the diagnosis of.

Pneumatosis intestinalis - UpToDat

Axial contrast-enhanced CT shows irregular punctuated gas column (long arrow) between the faeces and mucosal folds, which stops at the free gas-fluid level (short arrow), consistent with pseudo-pneumatosis intestinalis Fig. 15 Intramural gas in a 26-year-old woman with worsening abdominal pain. a Axial CT at a lung window shows a relatively. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is a low-incidence disease that confuses many doctors. A vast number of factors are suspected to contribute to its pathogenesis, such as Crohn's disease, intestinal stenosis, ulcerative colitis, drug use, extra-gastrointestinal diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Most consider its pathogenesis interrelated to an increase in intra.

Portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis: ominous

CT scan of the abdomen without contrast showed extensive portal venous air from the small branches in the periphery to the main portal and splenic veins (A and B). Considerable gaseous distention of the small bowel (C and D) and dilated loops of the small bowel were also seen (D and E). These findings were consistent with pneumatosis intestinalis Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is defined simply as the radiographic finding of gas within the bowel wall. PI is an uncommon entity which has recently come to increased clinical attention due to improved radiographic identification; others have cited the radiographic incidence of PI to be present in 0.37% of patients who have abdominal CT scans. PURPOSE: To determine whether computed tomographic (CT) findings can help differentiate between benign and clinically worrisome causes of pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and requirement for informed consent was waived

Massive pneumatosis intestinalis: CT diagnosis - ScienceDirec

The objectives are to (1) review common causes and complications of pneumatosis intestinalis; (2) describe characteristic CT findings that are associated with pneumatosis intestinalis; and (3) describe CT image features that help differentiate pseudo-pneumatosis versus pneumatosis intestinalis Pneumatosis intestinalis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of subserosal and submucosal gas, with air-filled cysts occurring anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract [].PI often presents as an incidental finding on abdominal imaging in asymptomatic patients, but it may occur in the context of life-threatening intestinal pathology, such as acute intestinal ischemia []

Pneumatosis cystoides coli | Image | RadiopaediaNecrotising enterocolitis | Image | Radiopaedia

Distinguishing benign and life-threatening pneumatosis

Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the gastrointestinal tract wall. Most cases of PI have a benign clinical course, although some have serious outcomes. Mechanical stress on or bacterial infection of the gastrointestinal tract wall may be responsible for the onset of PI, but the detailed mechanism of PI pathogenesis is still unclear Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is characterized by gas-filled cysts in the intestinal submucosa and subserosa. It is a rare disease with reported incidence of 0.03% and can occur in any age group [].PCI was first described by DuVernoi in 1783 and later subcategorized by Koss in 1952 [].It can be divided into primary or idiopathic (15%) type, which refers to air pockets that are. Secondary pneumatosis intestinalis is a disorder of small bowel or large bowel in which there is submucosal accumalation of gas pockets with causes that range from benign to life threatening CAUSES life threatening causes include Necrotizing Enerocolitis in infants, and mesenteric vascular disease in adults benign causes include increased intraluminal pressure - such as in COPD which can.

Pneumatosis intestinalis and portomesenteric venous gas in intestinal ischemia: correlation of CT findings with severity of ischemia and clinical outcome. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2001;177(6):1319-23. ] have reported that the PVG is not a useful indicator of bowel ischemia and is not helpful in determining the need for surgical intervention The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) and its incidents. We report here a case of PCI in an 88-year-old man with a provisional diagnosis of perforated viscus and possible ischaemic bowels based on CT findings of pneumoperitoneum. The patient was found to have extensive PCI on his small bowels Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis. Computed tomography shows aimage of the colon with thickening of the walls. CT scanning is often helpful in determining the primary cause of pneumatosis intestinalis, and it can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications

Conclusions Mucosal integrity, intraluminal pressure, bacterial flora, and intraluminal gas all interact in the formation of pneumatosis intestinalis. Radiography and computed tomography are the best diagnostic tests. Nonoperative management should be pursued in most patients, and underlying illnesses should be treated Medline ® Abstract for Reference 40 of 'Pneumatosis intestinalis'. CT predictors for differentiating benign and clinically worrisome pneumatosis intestinalis in children beyond the neonatal period. Radiology. 2009;253 (2):513. Epub 2009 Aug 25 CT images allow to distinguish pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis from intraluminal air and are excellent for the exploration of the abdominal cavity. Consistent with previous reports, the histological examination of the cysts from our case revealed multinucleated giant cells, macrophages and pericystic inflammation [ 1 , 9 ] Objective: Defining benign pneumatosis intestinalis as pneumatosis intestinalis that resolved with medical management alone, we sought to: (1) determine whether the incidence of benign pneumatosis intestinalis had increased at our pediatric cancer hospital; (2) characterize CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis; and (3) determine the. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a rare condition characterized by multiple air-filled cystic lesions in the submucosa or subserosa of the intestine. Despite a limited understanding of its pathogenesis, the causes of PI can be categorized into life-threatening or benign, which helps guide patient management. For benign etiologies, interventions should be minimized and endoscopic maneuvers.

Pneumatosis intestinalis leading to perioperative hypovolemic shock: Case report Yukako Takami*, Toshimori Koh, Minoru Nishio and Noboru Nakagawa Abstract Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is an uncommon disorder defined as multiple foci of gas within the intestinal wall Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is a rare disease characterized by multiple gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall and is associated with various comorbidities. We report herein a case of intractable paralytic ileus caused by primary PCI. A 73-year-old man visited out hospital complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. He had been hospitalized twice for intestinal obstruction in the. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is an uncommon disease with an unknown etiology, characterized by the presence of gas within the submucosa or subserosa of the intestine. In a recent study about Chinese population including 239 PCI cases, was found a M:F ratio of 2,4:1 and the mean age of patients was 45.3 ± 15.6 years (range: 2-81.

Distinguishing benign and life-threatening pneumatosis intestinalis in patients with cancer by CT imaging features. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2013; 200(5):1042-7 (ISSN: 1546-3141 Pneumatosis, also known as emphysema, is the abnormal presence of air or other gas within tissues.. In the lungs, emphysema involves enlargement of the distal airspaces, and is a major feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pneumoperitoneum (or peritoneal emphysema) is air or gas in the abdominal cavity, and is most commonly caused by a perforated abdominal organ CT has been shown to be more sensitive than radiography at detecting pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis. CT has also been shown to be more sensitive than radiography at detection of hepatic portal and portomesenteric venous gas, the presence of which increases the possibility of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis due to life-threatening causes Pneumatosis intestinalis is a condition in which multiple air-filled cysts develop in the intestinal submucosa or subserosa.1 There are several theories regarding the pathogenesis, involving mucosal integrity compromise, raised intraluminal pressure, bacterial flora and intraluminal gas interacting in the formation of pneumatosis intestinalis

Abdominal radiograph or computed tomography (CT) findings of isolated pneumatosis intestinalis can be due to a variety of causes like coeliac disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and post-organ transplants, but when seen in combination with HPVG is most frequently secondary to bowel ischaemia Pneumatosis intestinalis cystoides is a rare disorder defined as gaseous cysts in the bowel wall. While the etiology remains unclear, it has been associated with multiple conditions including, connective tissue disease, various drugs, colonoscopies, ileal surgeries, and chronic pulmonary disease[2,3] Pneumatosis intestinalis is a condition in which multiple air-filled cysts develop in the intestinal submucosa or subserosa.1 There are several theories regarding the pathogenesis, involving mucosal integrity compromise, raised intraluminal pressure, bacterial flora and intraluminal gas interacting in the formation of pneumatosis intestinalis. In the vast majority of cases, pneumatosis. Abstract. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the CT findings and clinical features of patients with pneumatosis intestinalis. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 to October 2007, 15 patients with pneumatosis intestinalis were diagnosed by the use of CT Coronal CT of large bowel ischemia (pneumatosis intestinalis)(yellow arrow) with portal venous gas(red arrow). Axial CT of large bowel ischemia (pneumatosis intestinalis)(Red arrow). About us. This website is dedicated to medical students and resident physicians.

Primary pneumatosis intestinalis is a benign idiopathic condition in which multiple gas-filled cystic lesions are seen in the gastrointestinal tract wall. The changes are usually seen initially on radiography or CT with CT being the more sensitive test. Epidemiology Computed tomography (CT) image of the abdomen and pelvis. The CT scan shows extensive bubble-like pneumatosis intestinalis along the entire colon (A, white arrows), branching lucencies indicating hepatic portal venous gas, and a low-attenuation lesion in the right lobe of the liver, suggestive of infarction of the liver (B, black arrows) Gas within the bowel wall is called pneumatosis intestinalis. Pneumatosis intestinalis is seen in life-treatening situations in patients with ischemia and impending bowel perforation, who need immediate therapy. However pneumatosis can also be found as an incidental finding in patients without abdominal complaints CT scans of the patient's chest, abdomen, Diagnosis Radiographic findings of air collections within the wall of the patient's intestines established pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) as the cause of her spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. The combination of a benign abdomen on examination, the absence of any other explanation for.

Pneumatosis Intestinalis Associated With Henoch–Schönlein

Non contrast computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis (axial view) shows air in the bowel wall. This radiologic sign is called Pneumatosis Intestinalis. There is also evidence of an over-distended ileum, and collapsed left colon suggesting an intestinal obstruction Pneumatosis intestinalis is a condition caused by gas in the mucous lining of the small or large intestine. A person who shows signs of the condition is likely to have an inflammatory gastrointestinal disorder or a pulmonary obstruction. Bacterial infections, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis can all lead to inflammation, irritation, and.

9. Day DL, Ramsay NK, Letourneau JG (1988) Pneumatosis intestinalis after bone marrow transplantation. AJR Am J Roentgenol 151: 85-87. [Crossref] Figure 1. Abdominal CT shows an intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal air brim. Figure 2. Abdominal CT: a large air brim of multicystic aspect extraluminal at the level of the cecal fundus Pneumatosis Intestinalis - Basics. Pneumatosis intestinalis refers to gas within the bowel wall. Can be visualized on: Plain radiographs; Fluoroscopy (ex, air-contrast enemas) CT scans; Ultrasound; MRI; It is NOT a diagnosis. It is a radiographic or physical finding. The cause of the pneumatosis intestinalis is the diagnosis. Pneumatosis. At first pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) was described on abdominal radiography. Now computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be more sensitive at detecting PI, but also at detection of additional findings such as intestinal ischemia or obstruction, bowel wall thickening, hepatic portal or porto-mesenteric venous gas, absen with pneumatosis intestinalis. The histological findings are typical of pneumatosis intestinalsis. In addition, the presence of perforation explains the clinical decision to remove the bowel surgically instead of the usual conservative medical management. DISCUSSION Pneumatosis intestinalis or pneumatosis cystoide

Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, HPVG = hepatic portal venous gas, ICU = intensive care unit, PI = pneumatosis intestinalis. How to cite this article: Wang M, Song J, Gong S, Yu Y, Hu W, Wang Y. Hepatic portal venous gas with pneumatosis intestinalis secondary to mesenteric ischemia in elderly patients: two case reports routine follow-up computed tomography (CT) showed PI involving the ascending and transverse colon, with free intraperitoneal gas (Figure 1). The patient had no symptoms, normal laboratory study results, and no evidence Case Report Pneumatosis intestinalis after lung transplantation for pulmonary graft-versus-host diseas

Pneumatosis intestinalis in a patient with scleroderma

a lung contrast-enhancement CT (CE-CT) excluding thromboembolism showed, as collateral finding, intraperitoneal free bubbles not present on a previous CT examination; the subsequent abdominal CE-CT described pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) involving the caecum and the right colon. Ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole was started Because of the widespread use of CT imaging, many nonischemic causes have been recently reported, including infectious, neoplastic and inflammatory bowel diseases for pneumatosis intestinalis, and portal pylephlebitis, abdominal trauma and iatrogenic procedures for portal venous gas.1, 2 Therefore, neither of the radiographic signs of portal. The presence of gas in the bowel wall, also referred to as pneumatosis intestinalis (PI), is an ominous finding when it is due to a GI vasculopathy3. PI is a radiographic finding that is associated with both benign and life-threatening causes. The benign variant of PI has been described in relation to immunosuppressive therapy6 and to JDM itself7

Clinical Features and Treatment of Scleroderma

Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a rare complication of chemotherapy, characterized by multiple gas accumulations within the bowel wall. A 71-year-old woman with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma was admitted to our hospital because of reduced consciousness. She was diagnosed as having leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LM) using lumbar puncture I am currently an xray tech student, and we have to analyze a radiograph. The one I'm looking at is a pediatric xray and the radiologist notes say Abdomen: mild gaseous distention of bowel without evidence of obstruction or pneumatosis intestinalis. I feel like distention is the same as the PI but I'm just unsure. Thank you The Beneficial Effect of TJ-134 for Patients With Symptomatic Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Change of computed tomography (CT) findings. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is an uncommon disorder defined as multiple foci of gas within the intestinal wall. Despite recognition of an increasing number of cases of PI, the optimal management strategy, whether through surgical or other means, remains controversial. The present report describes the case of a patient with PI who underwent exploratory laparotomy without specific findings and.

aHepatic portal venous gas after diving | BMJ Case Reports

Pneumatosis intestinalis. This elderly woman presented with large bowel obstruction. PFA shows dilated bowel as well as evidence of pneumoperitoneum (note the nice examples of Rigler's sign, yellow arrows). Also present on this x-ray is pneumastosis intestinalis - there is abnormal gas in the wall of the caecum and ascending colon, better. Abstract: Pneumatosis intestinalis, which could complicate a spectrum of clinical conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening, is a rarely encountered complication after lung transplantation (LT). We describe two cases in which PI developed as a complication following LT for pulmonary graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) A contrast computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis confirmed the findings of pneumatosis intestinalis in the cecum and ascending colon with intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal air, but did not reveal any portal venous gas (Figure 1B). Figure Computed tomography scan of the abdomen/pelvis two months after admission showing (a) recurrence of a small bowel obstruction with transition loop in right upper quadrant (white arrow), and (b) worsening intra-abdominal free air (black arrow), and recurrence of pneumatosis intestinalis (white arrow) 1 Introduction. Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) are abnormal accumulations of gas in the intestinal wall and portal vein, respectively. Bacterial translocation (BT) is defined as the passage of bacteria and bacterial endotoxins from the gut to other organs. Experimental studies have suggested that PI, HPVG, and BT share a similar pathogenetic mechanism in.